[{"id":"1","finalistGroupId":"1","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"finalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersCatholic-Relief.jpg","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Catholic-Releaf.png","name":"Catholic Relief Services","fullName":"Catholic Relief Services","cityCountry":"Baltimore, MD","teamID":"catholicrelief","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n
Changing how society cares for children in orphanages
\n\n\t\n","videoID":"q-BN0_mPC5g","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Catholic-Relief.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.crs.org

\n\n

Project Contact: Hilary O’Connor
Senior Program Officer, Foundations and Corporate Engagement, Catholic Relief Services, 100&change@crs.org

\n\n

CRS Social
\nTwitter: @CatholicRelief

\n
Twitter: @CRSnews
\n
Twitter: @CRS_expertise
\n
Facebook: Catholic Relief Services
\n
YouTube: Catholic Relief Services
\n

\n\n

Lumos Social
\nTwitter: @Lumos

\n
Facebook: Lumos

\n\n

Maestral International Social
Twitter: @MaestralIntl
Facebook: Maestral International

\n\n

 
\n

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

Globally, millions of children live in orphanages. Research shows 80-90 percent have a living parent, many of whom would prefer to care for their children if they had the resources to do so. Children are placed in orphanages primarily because of poverty and their families’ inability to access basic services such as education or specialized assistance for children with disabilities. Research demonstrates that residential care has a negative impact on children’s cognitive, physical, emotional, and intellectual development. In addition, well-meaning people donate millions of dollars to orphanages, while funds spent on orphanages could support integration of ten times as many children into families and achieve better results.

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

Catholic Relief Services, in partnership with Lumos and Maestral International, will change the way society cares for these children by reuniting them with supportive and nurturing families and transforming orphanages into family service providers. The partnership will prevent or slow down the number of new children entering residential care and strengthen families and caregivers so institutionalized children can be reintegrated into family care. Changing the Way We Care also intends to work closely with facility staff to identify and develop social service skills and outreach required to support children and families so they can stay together.

\n\t\t

With the aim of taking this solution globally, Changing the Way We Care will first work with governments, community leaders, and orphanage staff in seven developing countries to identify the best family-based option for each child, provide families with parenting skills and services, and help policymakers craft better policies that support family-based care. Changing the Way We Care will then use evidence from these seven demonstration countries to influence other countries, regional political bodies and funders to build global momentum and to redirect donations and resources to serve vulnerable children in a way that supports family-based care. 

\n\t\t

What's Changed?

\n\t\t\n\t\t

About Our Team

\n\t\t

\n\t\t

Changing the Way We Care has engaged a broad alliance around this solvable problem, including governments, orphanage directors, researchers, philanthropists, individual and institutional donors, faith leaders, private sector actors and, most importantly, parents, caregivers, and individuals who grew up in orphanages.

\n\t\t

Dr Shannon Senefeld
Senior Vice President, Overseas Operations, CRS

\n\t\t

Philip Goldman
Founder and President, Maestral International 

\n\t\t

Georgette Mulheir
Chief Executive, Lumos

\n\t\t

Caroline Bishop
Senior Technical Advisor for Vulnerable Children, CRS

\n\t\t

Fenny Mwamuye
4Children Project Director, CRS Kenya

\n\t\t

Vijayalakshmi Arora
Head of Programming, CRS India

\n\t\t

Kelley Bunkers
Technical Director for Child Welfare and Protection Systems, Maestral International

\n\t\t

Dr Domnica Ginu
Acting Country Director, Lumos Moldova

\n\t\t\n\t\n"},{"id":"2","finalistGroupId":"2","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"finalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersInternational-Food-Policy-Research.jpg","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-International-Food-Policy-Research.png","name":"HarvestPlus","fullName":"HarvestPlus","cityCountry":"Washington, DC","teamID":"harvestplus","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Eliminating hidden hunger in Africa by fortifying staple crops

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"5avPs6f3Sso","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-International-Food-Policy-Research.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.harvestplus.org

\n\n

Project Contact: Annette Sheckler
Head of Communications, a.sheckler@cgiar.org

\n\n

HarvestPlus Social:
Facebook\n
\n
Twitter
\n
YouTube
\n
LinkedIn

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Problem

\n\n

More than two billion people globally–nearly one person in three–have daily diets that lack sufficient vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin A, iron, and zinc, which are essential to health. Known as “hidden hunger,” these deficiencies lead to blindness, stunting, cognitive impairment, disease, and death. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where 70 percent of the world’s poor live, and where farm families primarily eat what they grow on small plots of land.

\n\n

The Solution

\n\n

HarvestPlus will use the simple power of “biofortification”—enriching foods through conventional plant breeding—to relieve hidden hunger and address one of the world’s biggest problems. The program will significantly expand this innovation, which was developed by its founder to offer a sustainable, farmer-controlled tool to fight malnutrition.

\n\n

Naturally nutrient-rich varieties of corn, cassava, wheat, and other staples are enhanced to provide 25 to 100 percent of the daily requirements for vitamin A, iron, and zinc. Crops are selected for development based on local diets and growing patterns, and new varieties are made available. Self-pollinated and hybrid varieties allow for seeds and planting material to be shared, and appeal to farmers for this reason.  No extra water, fertilizer, or cooking time is required for biofortified crops, and seed costs and yield per acre are the same as non-biofortified varieties. 

\n\n

With 26 million people already growing these biofortified crops, HarvestPlus plans to scale the introduction and dissemination of these varieties in 17 priority countries in Africa. Scaling will be done regionally through three existing administrative “hub countries”: Nigeria, Uganda, and Zambia. The expansion is expected to reach 100 million people in Africa by 2022, paving the way to reach 1 billion people globally by 2030.

\n\n

About Our Team

\n\n

\n\n

Our team—hailing from 15 countries on five continents—includes experts in nutrition, agriculture, finance, economics, marketing, seed systems, behavior change, evaluation and advocacy. These biofortification pioneers have worked with dozens of partners to develop more nutritious crops, introduce them to farming families, and measure their impact.

\n\n

Bev Postma\n
\n
Chief Executive Officer, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Sylvain Bidiaka\n
\n
Country Manager, DR Congo (cassava), HarvestPlus

\n\n

Paul Ilona\n
\n
Country Manager, Nigeria, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Lister Katsvairo\n
\n
Manager, Partnership Countries, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Antoine Lubobo\n
\n
Country Manager, DR Congo (beans), HarvestPlus

\n\n

Sylvia Magezi\n
\n
Country Manager, Uganda, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Bho Mudyahoto\n
\n
Head, Global Monitoring & Evaluation, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Joseph Mulambu\n
\n
Country Manager, Rwanda, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Wolfgang Pfeiffer\n
\n
Director, Research & Development, HarvestPlus

\n\n

Eliab Simpungwe\n
\n
Country Manager, Zambia, HarvestPlus

\n\n

What's Changed?

\n\n\n\n\t\n"},{"id":"3","finalistGroupId":"1","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"semifinalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersHimalayan-Cataract.png","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Himalayan-Cataract.png","name":"Himalayan Cataract Project","fullName":"Himalayan Cataract Project","cityCountry":"Waterbury, Vermont","teamID":"himalayancataract","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Eliminating needless blindness in Nepal, Ethiopia, and Ghana

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"EKiwH3vn7JI","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Himalayan-Cataract.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.cureblindness.org

\n\n

Team Partners: Aravind Eye Care System, India; L V Prasad Eye Institute, India; John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah; Department of Ophthalmology & Global Medicine, Stanford University; International Council of Ophthalmology, Magrabi – ICO Cameroon Eye Institute; Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana; Hospital, Addis Ababa University Dept. Ophthalmology, Ethiopia; Sight for Souls/ MCM Hospital, Ethiopia; Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology, Nepal; Clarity Design; Global Vision 2020; and Merge, an IBM Company

\n\n

Project Lead: Geoffrey Tabin, MD\n
\n
Co-Founder & Chairman, Himalayan Cataract Project

\n\n

Project Contact: Job Heintz, JD, MSL
Chief Executive Officer, jheintz@cureblindness.org

\n\n

Facebook\n
\n
Twitter\n
\n
YouTube

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

Blindness afflicts more than 39 million people worldwide, 90 percent of whom live in developing countries. Yet 80 percent of global blindness is treatable or preventable.

\n\t\t

Blindness magnifies poverty and poverty, in turn, perpetuates blindness. Inadequate eye care shortens lives, creates dependency on families and governments, reduces economic viability, and denies children education.

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

The Himalayan Cataract Project (HCP) will develop and deliver sustainable eye care in Nepal, Ethiopia, and Ghana, creating an adaptable “train the trainer” model that can be replicated and scaled around the world.

\n\t\t

HCP will invest in people and infrastructure, empowering local communities and enhancing local eye health care systems through training and new technology. The model takes into account geopolitical and cultural considerations in order to be most effective in each geographic setting.

\n\t\t

By training community health providers, the HCP will deliver cataract surgery and permanent refractive correction—commonly known as laser surgery— at low cost to more than 500,000 people. Sight-restoring cataract surgeries can be performed for as little as $25. 

\n\t\t

Studies have shown a 400 percent return on every dollar invested in eliminating blindness. The project is expected to bring significant gains to the families, communities, and countries involved and to provide a model for curing blindness in the developing world.

\n\t\n"},{"id":"4","finalistGroupId":"2","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"semifinalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersHuman-DX.png","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Human-DX.png","name":"Human Diagnosis Project","fullName":"Human Diagnosis Project","cityCountry":"San Francisco, CA","teamID":"humandiagnosis","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Providing virtual access to specialist medical care for underserved U.S. patients

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"iSVlb1B4gXQ","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Human-DX.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.humandx.org

\n\n

Team Partners: American Board of Internal Medicine, American Board of Medical Specialties, American College of Physicians, and the American Medical Association

\n\n

Project Lead & Project Contact: Jay Komarneni
Founder & Chair of the Human Diagnosis Project, contact@humandx.org

\n\n

Twitter
Facebook

\n\n

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

Nearly 30 million uninsured Americans rely on the nation’s safety net system of roughly 1,300 public hospitals, community health centers, and free clinics to provide primary care services regardless of their ability to pay.

\n\t\t

Yet, a critical gap remains: 91 percent of safety net clinics report difficulty obtaining specialty care for the uninsured, leading to sicker patients and increased ER visits and hospitalizations. For the one in ten Americans who lack health insurance and need specialty care, the options are limited: pay out of pocket or delay treatment.

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

Led by the Human Diagnosis Project, Specialty Net is an alliance of the nation's physician societies, licensing boards, and academic institutions that aims to close the specialty care gap for the nation's uninsured and underinsured.

\n\t\t

Specialty Net is an open, online system that seeks to provide public health and safety net institutions low-cost access to specialty care expertise. Specialty Net will engage 100,000 volunteer specialists to provide electronic consultations to three million patients in the U.S. safety net system over the next five years. Researchers at Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of California, San Francisco, are currently validating the system’s technology performance, cost, outcomes, and educational and training value.

\n\t\t

Patients will receive the specialty care they need, without having to wait or pay out of pocket. Specialists will receive credits toward their medical education, ongoing licensing, and maintenance of certification requirements. Each patient helped will add to an online system that combines collective intelligence with machine learning, helping to close the safety net specialty care gap and, ultimately, deliver this expertise globally.

\n\t\n"},{"id":"5","finalistGroupId":"3","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"semifinalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersThe-Internet-Archive.png","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-The-Internet-Archive.png","name":"Internet Archive","fullName":"Internet Archive","cityCountry":"San Francisco, CA","teamID":"internetarchive","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Providing libraries and learners free digital access to four million books

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"v7Qcpe30vXA","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-The-Internet-Archive.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: archive.org

\n\n

Project Lead & Project Contact: Wendy Hanamura\n
\n
Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive, wendy@archive.org

\n\n

Facebook\n
\n
Twitter: @InternetArchive\n
\n
Twitter: @OpenLibrary

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

Surprisingly, in the digital age millions of books, representing a century of knowledge, are not accessible online to scholars, journalists, students, and the public. Stymied by costs, e-book restrictions, policy risks, and missing infrastructure, libraries have struggled to meet the digital demand. Also, access to libraries is neither universal nor equitable.

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

The Internet Archive will expand libraries’ ability to deliver on their role as great equalizers, providing access to books and other resources to those who might not otherwise be able to afford them, regardless of geography.

\n\t\t

The Internet Archive will enable libraries to unlock their analog collections for a new generation of learners, enabling free, long-term, public access to knowledge. The project will curate, digitize, and make available in digital form four million books to any library that owns the physical book.

\n\t\t

The Internet Archive will start with the books most widely held and used in libraries and classrooms. The scale of the project will reduce digitization costs by 50 percent or more. The Internet Archive has prototyped this model for more than six years, digitizing 540,000 modern books originating from 100 partners and lending them to the public in a process that mirrors the way libraries traditionally lend physical books.

\n\t\n"},{"id":"6","finalistGroupId":"3","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"finalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersRice-University.jpg","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Rice-University.png","name":"Rice University","fullName":"Rice 360° Institute for Global Health (Rice University)","cityCountry":"Houston, TX","teamID":"riceuniversity","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Improving newborn survival in Africa

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"gQ-NIorX5DI","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Rice-University.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.rice360.rice.edu

\n\n

Project Contact: Rebecca Richards-Kortum\n
\n
Ph.D., Director, Rice 360° Institute for Global Health, rkortum@rice.edu

\n\n

Team Partners:\n
\n
University of Malawi College of Medicine\n
\n
University of Malawi Polytechnic
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Northwestern Kellogg School of Management
3rd Stone Design

\n\n

Rice360 Social
\n Facebook\n
\n
YouTube

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

Every year, 1.1 million newborns die in Africa alone, mostly from preventable causes—pre-term birth, complications of labor and delivery, and infections. Providing quality, comprehensive hospital care during birth, labor, and the first week of life can reduce newborn deaths by 75 percent; however, African hospitals lack life-saving technologies that have been available for more than 50 years in high-income countries.

\n\t\t

These technologies are not available for three reasons: (1) equipment designed for high-resource settings cannot withstand the harsh environments of African hospitals; (2) the business functions required to develop and distribute medical devices in Africa are poorly coordinated; and (3) local entrepreneurs lack sufficient training to maintain or design technologies.

\n\t\t

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

The Newborn Essential Solutions and Technologies (NEST) project addresses these gaps through three approaches: (1) Innovation to optimize a package of rugged, affordable technologies for quality, comprehensive newborn care; (2) Access by using evidence to generate large-scale demand for technologies and developing new distributions systems for their affordable delivery; and (3) Sustainability by educating a pipeline of clinicians and biomedical innovators able to lead systems change to improve newborn health.

\n\t\t

After scaling NEST throughout Malawi, the team will assess its cost-effectiveness in southern Tanzania, using this evidence to build demand. The team will work in Nigeria to refine its market, finance, and service strategies. And it will establish a nonprofit distributor in Tanzania and Nigeria.

\n\t\t

The team will partner with national healthcare systems and local educational institutions to ensure long-term local ownership of NEST. It will work with universities to educate a pipeline of future clinicians and innovators dedicated to improving newborn health. This new generation of professionals is key to sustaining NEST.

\n\t\t

Africa has the highest neonatal mortality rate in the world. It is no surprise that people continue to believe that African newborns are bound to die, but NEST can put this myth to rest. NEST will catalyze continent-wide change within a decade, saving the lives of 500,000 newborns every year at a cost of only $1.48 per birth. 

\n\t\t

What's Changed?

\n\t\t\n\t\t

About Our Team 

\n\t\t

\n\t\t

View full team ›

\n\t\t

Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Ph.D.
Director of Rice 360° Institute for Global Health, Malcolm Gillis University Professor, Rice University
NEST360° Principal Investigator

\n\t\t

Queen Dube, MBBS, MMed (Paeds.), Ph.D.
Paediatrician, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi
NEST Technologies and Package Optimization

\n\t\t

Josephine Langton, MBChB, MRCPCH
Academic Head of Department for the Pediatric and Child Health Department at University of Malawi College of Medicine; Pediatric Emergency Medicine Consultant at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi
NEST360° Clinical Curriculum

\n\t\t

Joy Lawn, BMedSci, MBBS, MPH, Ph.D., FRCPCH, FMedSci
Director of the Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive & Child Health (MARCH) Center, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
NEST360° Process, Impact and Cost Measurement

\n\t\t

Theresa Mkandawire MSc, Ph.D., MMIE
Dean of Faculty of Engineering, University of Malawi – Polytechnic, Blantyre, Malawi
NEST360° Pipeline of Biomedical Innovators Creation

\n\t\t

Robert Miros
Founder and CEO of 3rd Stone Design Inc.
NEST Distribution

\n\t\t

Elizabeth Molyneux, MBBS, FRCP, FRCPCH, FRCEM, DSc,h.c
Consultant Paediatrician, University of Malawi College of Medicine and Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi
NEST360° Clinical Users and Service Technician Training

\n\t\t

Maria Oden, Ph.D.
Director of Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen; Co-Director of Rice 360° Institute for Global Health University, Professor of Bioengineering, Rice University
NEST Technologies and Package Optimization

\n\t\t

Kara Palamountain
Research Associate Professor at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
NEST360° Demand Generation

\n\t\t\n\t\n"},{"id":"7","finalistGroupId":"4","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"finalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersSesame-Street.jpg","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Sesame-Street.png","name":"Sesame Workshop and IRC","fullName":"Sesame Workshop and the International Rescue Committee","cityCountry":"New York, NY","teamID":"sesameworkshop","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Educating children displaced by conflict and persecution

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"tOnw0Dcb3uc","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Sesame-Street.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Project Website\n
\n
sesameworkshop.org/refugees
\n
\nOrganization Websites
 
sesameworkshop.org\n
\n
rescue.org
\n

\n\n

Project Contacts:\n
\n
Lizzie Weinreb Fishman, Vice President, Strategic Communications, Sesame Workshop 
Elizabeth.Fishman@sesame.org
212-875-6618 (tel)

\n\n

Flavia Draganus, Director of Communications, International Rescue Committee
Flavia.Draganus@rescue.org\n
\n
212-551-2971 (tel)

\n\n

Sesame Workshop Social\n
\n
YouTube\n
\n
Twitter: @SesameWorkshop\n
\n
Twitter: @YellowFeather

\n\n

IRC Social\n
\n
Twitter: @theIRC
\n

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

The Problem

\n\n

The Syrian refugee crisis is the defining humanitarian issue of our time. It challenges

\n\n

our morals, imagination, leadership, and global stability. Failing to act can cast a long shadow: a lost generation of children whose lives are forever defined by their experience of war. Few Syrian children have opportunities to learn and play; many are neglected; some have been exposed to extreme violence. They are at risk of “toxic stress,” a biological response to prolonged and severe adversity that disrupts a child’s brain development. As adults, they may suffer poor health and struggle to find employment and rebuild their society.

\n\n

Yet the story of these children’s lives is still being written. Research shows that nurturing care and learning can reverse the effects of toxic stress, and skills developed in early childhood last a lifetime.

\n\n

The Solution

\n\n

The International Rescue Committee and Sesame Workshop will help heal the scars of war and cultivate the full potential of an entire generation. Sesame Seeds, delivered through mass media and direct services, will use proven techniques to measurably transform children’s learning and social-emotional skills and mitigate the effects of toxic stress. Through extensive research, we have developed a solution that is intense enough to be life-changing but cost-effective enough to be scalable. 

\n\n

The solution has three components: 1) Sesame Seeds Mass Media, a television program that will reach 9.4 million children in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria, with engaging characters with whom children can learn and relate; 2) Sesame Seeds Home, a caregiving program delivered through home visits and mobile messages; and 3) Sesame Seeds Center, an early learning program delivered in community and NGO centers and government preschools, providing teachers with digital and print lesson plans and educational content. Sesame Seeds  Home and Center will marshal frontline service professionals to serve 1.5 million of the most vulnerable children.

\n\n

Sesame Seeds will mitigate some of war’s most harmful consequences and empower today’s victims to be tomorrow’s nation builders.

\n\n

What's Changed?

\n\n\n\n

About Our Team

\n\n

\n\n

The Sesame-IRC team encompasses a diversity of backgrounds. Experienced in the fields of early childhood education and development, advocacy, production, peace and human rights, public health, technology, management, and public relations and marketing, team members collaborate and use their skills to better the world for children everywhere. 

\n\n

Estee Bardanashvili\n
\n
Senior Producer, International Social Impact, Sesame Workshop

\n\n

Nada Elattar\n
\n
Director of Educational Programs, International Social Impact, Sesame Workshop

\n\n

Jennifer Kotler Clarke\n
\n
Vice President, Research and Evaluation, Sesame Workshop

\n\n

Shari Rosenfeld\n
\n
Senior Vice President, International Social Impact, Sesame Workshop

\n\n

Sherrie Westin\n
\n
Executive Vice President, Global Impact & Philanthropy, Sesame Workshop

\n\n

Ravi Gurumurthy\n
\n
Chief Innovation Officer, International Rescue Committee

\n\n

Katie Murphy\n
\n
Senior Technical Advisor for Early Childhood Development, International Rescue Committee

\n\n

Mark Schnellbaecher\n
\n
Regional Director for the Middle East, International Rescue Committee

\n\n

Sarah Smithb\n
\n
Senior Director, Education, International Rescue Committee

\n\n

Hirokazu Yoshikawa\n
\n
Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education
Co-Director, Global TIES for Children Center, New York University 

\n\n\n\n\t\n"},{"id":"8","finalistGroupId":"4","finalistCategory":"finalist","type":"semifinalist","catId":"1","finalistHero":"img/finalists/bannersCarter-Center.png","finalistThumb":"img/finalists/bannersThumb_-Carter-Center.png","name":"The Carter Center","fullName":"The Carter Center","cityCountry":"Atlanta, GA","teamID":"cartercenter","summary":"\n\t\n\t\n\n

Eliminating river blindness in Nigeria

\n\n\t\n","videoID":"UwdFWRtR8Q8","finalistLogo":"img/finalists/bannersLogo_-Carter-Center.png","sidebarContent":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\n

Website: www.cartercenter.org

\n\n

Team Partners: Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health

\n\n

Project Lead: Dr. Frank Richards\n
\n
Director, River Blindness Elimination Program, Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Program, and Schistosomiasis Control Program, The Carter Center

\n\n

Project Contact: Nicole Kruse
Chief Development Officer, The Carter Center, nicole.kruse@cartercenter.org

\n\n

Facebook\n
\n
Twitter\n
\n
YouTube

\n\n\t\n","fullBio":"\n\t\n\t\n\t\n\t\t

The Problem

\n\t\t

River blindness affects an estimated 32.7 million people worldwide. Caused by a worm parasite that spreads via the bite of a black fly, the disease is most endemic in Nigeria. With its dense and growing population, roughly 50 million people in 40,000 communities in Nigeria are infected with or at risk of the disease.

\n\t\t

River blindness causes devastating socio-economic repercussions in Africa, resulting in food insecurity, lack of education for children who must care for blinded parents, intergenerational poverty, and social stigma.

\n\t\t

The Solution

\n\t\t

The Carter Center will eliminate transmission of river blindness disease in Nigeria, creating a model for the rest of Africa and the world.

\n\t\t

In partnership with the Ministry of Health and local NGOs, the Center will work through community-directed distribution systems to administer the drug ivermectin (Mectizan®, donated by Merck & Co.) once or twice per year. This medicine is proven to stop transmission of the condition. 

\n\t\t

The program will train community-level volunteers in the appropriate dosing and administration of the drug and to provide health education to families and neighbors, creating a sustainable, rudimentary healthcare infrastructure in remote communities. 

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Similar Carter Center projects have eliminated river blindness from four countries in the Americas and from parts of Uganda and Sudan. This project will bring these best practices to scale across Nigeria, demonstrating that eliminating river blindness is possible in even the largest and most challenging environments.

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